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The world’s most extreme sports revealed

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‘Skyaking’ involves leaping 13,000 feet out of a plane in a kayak, which is unsurprisingly tricky to balance

In places such as Nicaragua, it is possible to snowboard down the sides of active volcanoes 

Two men once bodyboarded down Europe’s largest glacier, the Aletsch in Switzerland, fitted with flippers

Does the idea of leaping out of a plane bore you?

Then why not get hold of a kayak, and go hurtling towards earth crouched in that?

This stunt, known as ‘Skyaking’, is just one of the extreme sports you can partake in around the world, and here MailOnline Travel reveals the rest – from daredevil activities like bodyboarding down Swiss glaciers to snowboarding on active volcanoes in Indonesia.

Skyaking

Miles Daisher demonstrates 'skyaking' in which the skydiver leaps from the plane in a kayak and lands on water, seen here accompanied by cameramen  wearing wingsuits designed to help them glide like a flying squirrelMiles Daisher demonstrates 'skyaking' in which the skydiver leaps from the plane in a kayak and lands on water, seen here accompanied by cameramen  wearing wingsuits designed to help them glide like a flying squirrel

Miles Daisher demonstrates ‘skyaking’ in which the skydiver leaps from the plane in a kayak and lands on water, seen here accompanied by cameramen  wearing wingsuits designed to help them glide like a flying squirrel

Paddling across the sky in a kayak at 13,000ft before winding up in a lake below – about as curious a sport as you can imagine.

It’s the brainchild of Miles Daisher, from Twin Falls, Idaho, who famously filmed the stunt in 2010 when he landed over Lake Tahoe.

Unlike skydiving, the parachute is automatically opened by a static line attached to the plane. The kayak’s build slows the pace of descent but is also much harder to balance.

Unlike skydiving, the parachute is automatically opened by a static line attached to the planeUnlike skydiving, the parachute is automatically opened by a static line attached to the plane
While the kayak's build slows the pace of decent, it is also much harder to balanceWhile the kayak's build slows the pace of decent, it is also much harder to balance

Unlike skydiving, the parachute is automatically opened by a static line attached to the plane, left, and while the kayak’s build, right, slows the pace of decent, it is also much harder to balance

Volcano snowboarding

If standard snowboarding doesn’t quite get your pulse racing, then perhaps this will.

In 2015, Malaysian photographer Keow Wee Loong was captured by his colleagues as one of the first people to ever snowboard down an erupting volcano – Mount Bromo in East Java, Indonesia – a ‘No Enter, Danger Zone’ with a Level 3 alert warning.

Other spots that welcome regular borders include the Cerro Negro in Cordillera de los Maribios, one of the most active volcanoes in Nicaragua.

In 2015, Malaysian photographer Keow Wee Loong, pictured, was captured by his colleagues as one of the first people to ever snowboard down an erupting volcano - Mount Bromo in East Java, Indonesia - a 'No Enter, Danger Zone'In 2015, Malaysian photographer Keow Wee Loong, pictured, was captured by his colleagues as one of the first people to ever snowboard down an erupting volcano - Mount Bromo in East Java, Indonesia - a 'No Enter, Danger Zone'

In 2015, Malaysian photographer Keow Wee Loong, pictured, was captured by his colleagues as one of the first people to ever snowboard down an erupting volcano – Mount Bromo in East Java, Indonesia – a ‘No Enter, Danger Zone’

A boarder on the Cerro Negro in Cordillera de los Maribios, one of the most active volcanoes in NicaraguaA boarder on the Cerro Negro in Cordillera de los Maribios, one of the most active volcanoes in Nicaragua
Mr Loong approaching Mount BromoMr Loong approaching Mount Bromo

Pictured, left, a boarder on the Cerro Negro in Cordillera de los Maribios, one of the most active volcanoes in Nicaragua, and right, Mr Loong approaching Mount Bromo

Glacier body boarding

Why go bodyboarding in the boring ocean when you can zoom head-first down freezing ice instead?

That’s what Swiss thrillseekers Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin asked themselves before taking on Europe’s largest glacier, the Aletsch in Switzerland – fitted with flippers, helmets and specially adapted bodyboards.

Only a handful of people are qualified to partake in this sport – with the risks including being carried away by strong currents, drowning in hidden crevices or overwhelmed by collapsing glacial lakes.

Swiss thrillseekers Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin, pictured, bodyboarded on Europe's largest glacier, the Aletsch in Switzerland - fitted with flippers, helmets and specially adapted boardsSwiss thrillseekers Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin, pictured, bodyboarded on Europe's largest glacier, the Aletsch in Switzerland - fitted with flippers, helmets and specially adapted boards

Swiss thrillseekers Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin, pictured, bodyboarded on Europe’s largest glacier, the Aletsch in Switzerland – fitted with flippers, helmets and specially adapted boards

Risks include being carried away by strong currents, drowning in hidden crevices or overwhelmed by collapsing glacial lakesRisks include being carried away by strong currents, drowning in hidden crevices or overwhelmed by collapsing glacial lakes
There's no room for manoeuvre with glacier body boardingThere's no room for manoeuvre with glacier body boarding

Risks include being carried away by strong currents, drowning in hidden crevices or overwhelmed by collapsing glacial lakes

Only a handful of people are qualified to partake in this sport, which involves navigating sections of both ice and flowing waterOnly a handful of people are qualified to partake in this sport, which involves navigating sections of both ice and flowing water

Only a handful of people are qualified to partake in this sport, which involves navigating sections of both ice and flowing water

Extreme ironing

Invented by a bored 17-year-old rock climber, Canadian Kevin Krupitzer, extreme ironing is fairly self-explanatory when you see it in action.

The acutely random hobby has led him to scale a 120ft rock in Arizona’s Queen Creek Canyon, known as the Totem Pole, with an ironing board strapped to his back.

Extreme ironing has since been embraced by copycats around the world – with stuntmen taking their laundry accoutrements under the British sea, for example, and to Japan’s frozen Lake Hibar.

Invented by a bored 17-year-old rock climber, Canadian Kevin Krupitzer, pictured atop a 120ft rock in Arizona's Queen Creek Canyon known as the Totem Pole, extreme ironing is fairly self-explanatory when you see it in actionInvented by a bored 17-year-old rock climber, Canadian Kevin Krupitzer, pictured atop a 120ft rock in Arizona's Queen Creek Canyon known as the Totem Pole, extreme ironing is fairly self-explanatory when you see it in action

Invented by a bored 17-year-old rock climber, Canadian Kevin Krupitzer, pictured atop a 120ft rock in Arizona’s Queen Creek Canyon known as the Totem Pole, extreme ironing is fairly self-explanatory when you see it in action

Extreme ironing has since been embraced by copycats around the world - with stuntmen taking their laundry accoutrements under the British sea, pictured, among other locationsExtreme ironing has since been embraced by copycats around the world - with stuntmen taking their laundry accoutrements under the British sea, pictured, among other locations
Japan's frozen Lake HibarJapan's frozen Lake Hibar

Extreme ironing has since been embraced by copycats around the world – with stuntmen taking their laundry accoutrements under the British sea, for example, left, and to Japan’s frozen Lake Hibar, right

Others have performed household chores on a car roof in the Sahara DesertOthers have performed household chores on a car roof in the Sahara Desert
Extreme ironing has also taken place on cliff edgesExtreme ironing has also taken place on cliff edges

Others have performed household chores on a car roof in the Sahara Desert, left, and dangling from the edge of cliff, right

Water jet packs

Costly, at around £180 for a 15-minute go, these devices can propel the user 30 feet into the air.

Operated by a backpack that pumps water through a hose, it’s an Iron Man-esque piece of kit that has won celebrity fans including Leonardo DiCaprio.

The JetLev-Flyer, for example, employs a 300 horse power jetpack to allow the wearer to fly at speeds of up to 62mph and perform tight turns and hovers. The system has, however, come under fire in the past from nature preservationists who claim it is damaging to surrounding ecosystems.

The JetLev-Flyer, pictured, employs a 300 horse power jetpack to allow the wearer to fly at speeds of up to 62mph and perform tight turns and hoversThe JetLev-Flyer, pictured, employs a 300 horse power jetpack to allow the wearer to fly at speeds of up to 62mph and perform tight turns and hovers

The JetLev-Flyer, pictured, employs a 300 horse power jetpack to allow the wearer to fly at speeds of up to 62mph and perform tight turns and hovers

Operated by a backpack which pumps water through a hose, it's an Iron Man-esque piece of kitOperated by a backpack which pumps water through a hose, it's an Iron Man-esque piece of kit
The system has, however, come under fire in the past from nature preservationists who claim it is damaging to surrounding ecosystemsThe system has, however, come under fire in the past from nature preservationists who claim it is damaging to surrounding ecosystems

Operated by a backpack which pumps water through a hose, it’s an Iron Man-esque piece of kit, pictured, which has won celebrity fans including Leonardo DiCaprio

Cliff diving

Diving off jagged cliffs into the water below is a past-time not for the faint of heart.

People do it all around the world but some regions are famous for it – Mexico’s ‘La Quebrada Cliff Divers’, for example, jump 100ft off the cliffs in Acapulco, plunging into the pool below them that fluctuates between six and 16ft deep depending on the surging surf.

Red Bull also hosts its annual Cliff Diving World Series in hair-raising locations dotted around the planet.

Mexico's 'La Quebrada Cliff Divers', one pictured, jump 100ft off the cliffs in Acapulco and plunge into the pool below themMexico's 'La Quebrada Cliff Divers', one pictured, jump 100ft off the cliffs in Acapulco and plunge into the pool below them

Mexico’s ‘La Quebrada Cliff Divers’, one pictured, jump 100ft off the cliffs in Acapulco and plunge into the pool below them

America's Steven LoBue competes in the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series in Shirahama, JapanAmerica's Steven LoBue competes in the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series in Shirahama, Japan
Canada's Lysanne Richard in the same contestCanada's Lysanne Richard in the same contest

America’s Steven LoBue, left, and Canada’s Lysanne Richard, right, compete in the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series in Shirahama, Japan

Ice canyoning

In a feat horrifying for anyone with a fear of heights, this sport involves stabbing your way up ice-cloaked walls using sharp mini-sledgehammer devices and spiked shoes.

One particularly famous location for this is Colorado’s Ouray Ice Park, a manmade icy venue operated in a natural gorge.

The park is free to the public and runs regular contests, which see hardened climbers battle it out against the clock to reach the 50ft summit.

One particularly famous location for scrambling up icy cliffs with the help of sharp instruments is Colorado's Ouray Ice Park beloved by climbers including Rob Cordey-Cotter, seen hereOne particularly famous location for scrambling up icy cliffs with the help of sharp instruments is Colorado's Ouray Ice Park beloved by climbers including Rob Cordey-Cotter, seen here
It's a manmade icy venue operated in a natural gorgeIt's a manmade icy venue operated in a natural gorge

One particularly famous location for scrambling up icy cliffs with the help of sharp instruments is Colorado’s Ouray Ice Park, pictured – a manmade icy venue operated in a natural gorge, beloved by climbers including Rob Cordey-Cotter, seen here

Rope swing bungee jumping

Bungee jumping with a twist, this slight variation involves flinging oneself into a gorge and swinging around like a monkey.

In 2013, a fairly epic set-up was constructed in South Africa over Magwa Falls by adventure junkie Andrew Kirkpatrick and American stunt co-ordinator Mike Wilson.

Only eight people were hardcore enough to brave the four seconds of free-fall and 600ft plunge.

In 2013, a fairly epic bungee rope swing was constructed in South Africa over Magwa Falls, pictured, by adventure junkie Andrew Kirkpatrick and American stunt co-ordinator Mike WilsonIn 2013, a fairly epic bungee rope swing was constructed in South Africa over Magwa Falls, pictured, by adventure junkie Andrew Kirkpatrick and American stunt co-ordinator Mike Wilson

In 2013, a fairly epic bungee rope swing was constructed in South Africa over Magwa Falls, pictured, by adventure junkie Andrew Kirkpatrick and American stunt co-ordinator Mike Wilson

Only eight people were brave enough to brave the four seconds of free-fall and 600ft plunge, seen hereOnly eight people were brave enough to brave the four seconds of free-fall and 600ft plunge, seen here
It's a slight variation on bungee jumping and involves flinging oneself into a gorge and swinging around like a monkeyIt's a slight variation on bungee jumping and involves flinging oneself into a gorge and swinging around like a monkey

Only eight people were brave enough to brave the four seconds of free-fall and 600ft plunge, seen here

Cliff camping

This vertigo-inducing trend involves strapping a tent to the side of a monumental cliff and hanging out there, quite literally.

It offers breathtaking views, obviously, and gives serious climbers the opportunity to spend multiple days on the rock face without having to come down between climbs.

Fancy trying it? Head to Colorado’s Adventure Center in Estes Park and enjoy their custom-crafted ‘portaledges’, which cost an eyewatering $1,200 (£966) per person, per night.

This vertigo-inducing trend involves strapping a tent to the side of a monumental cliff, and gives serious climbers the opportunity to spend multiple days on the rock face without having to come down between climbsThis vertigo-inducing trend involves strapping a tent to the side of a monumental cliff, and gives serious climbers the opportunity to spend multiple days on the rock face without having to come down between climbs

This vertigo-inducing trend involves strapping a tent to the side of a monumental cliff, and gives serious climbers the opportunity to spend multiple days on the rock face without having to come down between climbs

Anyone can try it at Colorado's Adventure Center in Estes Park, pictured,Anyone can try it at Colorado's Adventure Center in Estes Park, pictured,
These custom-crafted 'portaledges' cost an eyewatering $1,200 (£966) per person, per nightThese custom-crafted 'portaledges' cost an eyewatering $1,200 (£966) per person, per night

Anyone can try it at Colorado’s Adventure Center in Estes Park, pictured, using their custom-crafted ‘portaledges’, which cost an eyewatering $1,200 (£966) per person, per night

Storm chasing

Most people get as far away as possible when news comes in of an approaching tornado.

But not storm chasers, who keep a close eye on the weather forecast in the hope that they can capture a major climate calamity as it happens around them.

It goes without saying that this is a very dangerous business, one which killed three professional storm chasers and one amateur in 2013 during the El Reno storm in Oklahoma.

Storm chasers keep a close eye on the weather forecast in the hope that they can capture a major climate calamity as it happens around them - often they are journalists, as seen here in Sterling, OklahomaStorm chasers keep a close eye on the weather forecast in the hope that they can capture a major climate calamity as it happens around them - often they are journalists, as seen here in Sterling, Oklahoma

Storm chasers keep a close eye on the weather forecast in the hope that they can capture a major climate calamity as it happens around them – often they are journalists, as seen here in Sterling, Oklahoma

One company in Oklahoma - Extreme Tornado Tours - offers a guided  exploration of the state's worst weather, picturedOne company in Oklahoma - Extreme Tornado Tours - offers a guided  exploration of the state's worst weather, pictured
A truck chasing a tornado in ColoradoA truck chasing a tornado in Colorado

One company in Oklahoma – Extreme Tornado Tours – offers a guided  exploration of the state’s worst weather, left, and right, a truck chasing a tornado in Colorado

Ocean zorbing

A niche take on what is a fairly popular hobby, this sees people roll around in the sea encased in a giant inflatable bubble.

In 2014, endurance athlete Reza Baluchi attempted to ‘run’ more than 1,000 miles from South Florida to Bermuda in his self-designed $4,500 (£3,600) ‘hydro pod’.

Sadly for Mr Baluchi, the stunt ended in a rescue mission in which he was plucked from the raging ocean leaving his beloved vessel behind.

In 2014, endurance athlete Reza Baluchi attempted to ¿run¿ more than 1,000 miles from South Florida to Bermuda in his self-designed $4,500 (£3,600) 'hydro pod', picturedIn 2014, endurance athlete Reza Baluchi attempted to ¿run¿ more than 1,000 miles from South Florida to Bermuda in his self-designed $4,500 (£3,600) 'hydro pod', pictured

In 2014, endurance athlete Reza Baluchi attempted to ‘run’ more than 1,000 miles from South Florida to Bermuda in his self-designed $4,500 (£3,600) ‘hydro pod’, pictured

Sadly for Mr Baluchi, pictured, this ended in a rescue missionSadly for Mr Baluchi, pictured, this ended in a rescue mission
He was plucked from the raging ocean leaving his beloved vessel behind, picturedHe was plucked from the raging ocean leaving his beloved vessel behind, pictured

Sadly for Mr Baluchi, left, this ended in a rescue mission in which he was plucked from the raging ocean leaving his beloved vessel behind, right

Mountain unicycling

Extreme mountain unicycling – riding with just one wheel – was pioneered during the 1990s on the West Coast of the US, and has since attracted thousands of enthusiasts from around the world.

Practitioners claim the sport is no more dangerous than mountain biking, despite the frequency of falls.

Perhaps not one to try at home – the sport has even spawned its own terminology for the many injuries it can cause, such as ‘shindentations’ (marks where rocks puncture the front of the legs) and ‘calf tracks’ (thin scars where the pedals cut into the back of the calves).

Extreme mountain unicycling - riding with just one wheel - was pioneered during the 1990s on the West Coast of the US, and has since attracted thousands of enthusiasts from around the world, seen here in Canada's British Columbia Extreme mountain unicycling - riding with just one wheel - was pioneered during the 1990s on the West Coast of the US, and has since attracted thousands of enthusiasts from around the world, seen here in Canada's British Columbia 

Extreme mountain unicycling – riding with just one wheel – was pioneered during the 1990s on the West Coast of the US, and has since attracted thousands of enthusiasts from around the world, seen here in Canada’s British Columbia

Practitioners claim the sport is no more dangerous than mountain biking, despite the frequency of fallsPractitioners claim the sport is no more dangerous than mountain biking, despite the frequency of falls
A daring rider also in British ColumbiaA daring rider also in British Columbia

Practitioners claim the sport is no more dangerous than mountain biking, despite the frequency of falls – pictured, riders also in British Columbia

Mountainboarding

This sport was invented in 1992 by San Francisco snowboarders Jason Lee and Patrick McConnell and, as it caught on, downhill, slalom and ‘boardercross’ competitions soon followed.

Halfway between a skateboard and a snowboard, the device has a flexible deck and inflatable tyres at each corner which absorb shock impact.

Riders can reach dizzying speeds of up to 60mph. Best to wear a helmet then.

Halfway between a skateboard and a snowboard, the device has a flexible deck and inflatable tyres at each corner which absorb shock impact, seen here in FranceHalfway between a skateboard and a snowboard, the device has a flexible deck and inflatable tyres at each corner which absorb shock impact, seen here in France

Halfway between a skateboard and a snowboard, the device has a flexible deck and inflatable tyres at each corner which absorb shock impact, seen here in France

Riders can reach dizzying speeds of up to 60mphRiders can reach dizzying speeds of up to 60mph
This rider in France is wearing protective gear that somewhat resembles a storm trooper uniformThis rider in France is wearing protective gear that somewhat resembles a storm trooper uniform

Riders can reach dizzying speeds of up to 60mph, with this rider in France, right, wearing protective gear that somewhat resembles the uniform of a storm trooper

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